The Quilting Way: Quilts by the Swamp Fox Quilters Guild

Smith University Center Gallery
May 23 – July 27, 2006
8:00 am – 5:30 pm Mon-Thur; 8:00-11:00 am Fri

The Swamp Fox Quilters Guild was started in 1980. Its purpose is to educate, create, and stimulate interest in maintaining, protecting, collecting and preserving quilts. Also, the group strives to unite members in bonds of friendship through the shared appreciation of quilt making,

The guild, with approximately 50 members, meets the first Thursday of each month at 9:30 a.m. at John Calvin Presbyterian Church, except for July. It has an annual “quilting challenge.” Yearly, it exhibits at The Columns during the Civil War re-enactment, displaying quilts and giving demonstrations. Also, it makes community service quilts for nursing homes, shelters and various civic organizations.

A Dance of Fire: New Works by Feather Pottery & Interiors
Sasha & Tari Federer

Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery
May 23 – July 27, 2006
8:00 am – 5:30 pm Mon-Thur; 8:00-11:00 am Fri

“Working in clay represents, for me, a timeless desire to combine objects of use with beauty, by creating the unique from the ordinary, and to experience beauty in everyday moments.” – Sasha

Born in Prague, Czechoslovakia Republic, Sasha has lived in USA for half his life, in Florence for twelve years — as a clinical neuro-psychologist by profession, and as a potter by passion. He studied pottery in Washington and Wisconsin, worked three years as a professional potter in New Hampshire and served as artist-in-residence with the National Endowment for the Arts.

“Working with clay represents the interconnectedness with the forces of nature that surround and inspire us, along with the shapes that evolve from deep within. My mission is to combine these shapes and forces into art form and functionality.” – Tari

Spending much of her life in the Southwest, Tari studied as an art major at Ventura College and the University of California Santa Barbara. Five years ago she closed her studio in North Carolina and moved to Florence, SC, to marry and join forces with Sasha. Their joining has resulted in a creative collaboration in their quest to create in clay at their studio, Feather Pottery and Interiors in Florence.

Seen/Unseen – A Textured Life
Abstracts by Angela Ketcham

Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery
May 23 – July 27, 2006
8:00 am – 5:30 pm Mon-Thur; 8:00-11:00 am Fri

“Everyone knows the world ain’t flat. It’s bumpy.

“The body of work in Seen/Unseen-A Textured Life is an exploration – and celebration – of the layered and tactile nature of the everyday experiences that make up Life. A humid drive on a familiar road, the grainy melt of cheap chocolate, a bug bite… Each carries a wealth of sensory memory, an amalgam of smells, tastes, and yes – textures.

“Using color, symbol, and layers of paint, reclaimed consumer throwaways and materials from nature, these paintings and sculptures attempt to distill such rich yet mundane experiences to a visual form. Each piece functions as a kind of topographical visceral map; they are intended to inform at gut level.

“Many of the works may reveal surprises upon close inspection… and who can say what is buried unseen beneath the surface?”

Southern Fried
Ceramics Surfaces Symposium
Potters Council Regional Conference

Hyman Fine Arts Center
July 27-29, 2006

The ceramic surface is often an unknown entity, much like the blue plate special at your local diner. Sometimes developed in the clay it self, surface design and consideration can occur at several stages from wet to leather hard to bone dry. Other times the surface is applied after the form is established with slips and under glazes or eventually with glaze. Even the kiln and the firing process interjects itself upon the clay surface, leaving marks or transforming the surface in wonderful and mysterious ways.

Various local area ceramics artists shared their tricks of the trade including Ms. Patz Fowle, who has lent “Miss Dixie Cup” to the conference to be a temporary spokeswoman. Other ceramic artists to present included Mel Jacobson, David Hendley, Rikki Gill, Stephani Stephenson, Tari and Sasha Federer, Kurt Wild, Virginia Scotchie and more.

Vessels: Ceramics by Hiroshi Sueyoshi

Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery
August 8 – September 28, 2006

Artist’s Slide Lecture and Gallery Talk:
Thursday, September 28, 2:00 pm
Kassab Recital Hall (adjacent to FAC Gallery)

“My inspiration comes from information about nature and an appreciation of nature that includes humans as part of nature. I would like to see landscapes, movement, and spaces in nature in my work. I also enjoy creating tension inside spaces and outside spaces which draws me to the challenge of creating vessels as sculptural form.”

A native of Tokyo, Japan, Sueyoshi works primarily in thrown and hand built porcelain using the Japanese neriage and nerikomi techniques of sandwiching and faceting uncolored and colored porcelain. Sueyoshi studied at Tokyo Aeronautical College and Ochanomizu Design Academy prior to becoming an apprentice with Masanao Narui in Mashiko, Japan in 1968. He moved to the United States in 1971 to help design and build Humble Mill Pottery in Asheboro, NC. Since then, Sueyoshi has lived in North Carolina and has worked with Seagrove Pottery as a production potter and with the Sampson Arts Council in Clinton as a pottery instructor. Currently an artist in residence, Sueyoshi works and teaches at the Cameron Art Museum in Wilmington, NC. His pieces are in many private, corporate and institutional collections around the country.

Gallery Reception: Tuesday, 5 September
7:00-8:00 p.m., Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery

Retrospective: Paintings of John W. Baker

Smith University Center Gallery
August 8 – October 26, 2006

Gallery Reception: Tuesday, 5 September
7:00-8:00 p.m., Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery

The late John W. Baker, for whom the Music/Art wing of the Hyman Fine Arts Center is named, was the founding Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of Francis Marion College, later serving as Dean of Students as well as Chairman of the Department of Fine Arts.

Having received his doctorate in music composition, Jack composed in a wide range of styles for various vocal and instrumental ensembles. He performed often on clarinet: with symphony orchestras and chamber groups for the love of ‘classical’ music; and in pick-up gigs with Dixieland and swing bands for the pure fun of it.

A long-time admirer of modern art, when Jack later began to paint, his ultimate goal was to provide multiple images overlaid and intertwined, occupying a single space in a manner analogous to musical counterpoint or polyphony. In addition to solo shows at Francis Marion, the Florence Museum, and galleries in Columbia and Winston-Salem, Jack’s paintings have been accepted in numerous state and regional juried exhibitions. Several of his works are displayed on campus, including the painting on the left, which normally resides in the the Fine Arts Center main office.

Natural Selections: Photographs and Sculptures by Tom Herzog

Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery
August 15 – September 28, 2006

Gallery Reception: Tuesday, 5 September
7:00-8:00 p.m., Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery

“For the majority of my life I have expressed myself creatively through watercolor painting, but in recent years I have become fascinated with the making of sculptures that consist of the aesthetic arrangements of found natural materials. I began playing with form, texture, light and shadow, color and balance using only those materials I could find in nature. . . The sculptures themselves are usually ephemeral so that up until now, photographs were the only record of their brief existence and a way to remember the discoveries that have been revealed. The sculptures ‘in the wild’ are quite mystical and are very rooted to place. . . More recently I’ve thought that it would be profound to experience that wild magic and mystery indoors, so I began cementing the stacked stone pieces together so that they could be portable and more permanent.”

Herzog received a Bachelors degree in Art from Montana State University-Billings. Recently he moved to Florence, South Carolina with his wife, Teresa. He continues to paint and sculpt in his studio. His watercolor paintings have won numerous awards in national and international juried competitions. His work may be found in corporate and private collections throughout the country.

4-Series: Drawings and Sculpture by Linda McCune

Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery
October 3 – November 16, 2006

Artist’s Lecture: Nov. 16, 12:45 pm, HFAC 213

“Expiatory, documentary works retain their urgency and vitality for me because of their attachment to and concern for life issues. In these works an understanding of the past and present emotional and ethical struggles join and give explanation to each other as they magnify the universal leveling effect of time.

These mimetically stated yet strongly symbolic objects have an even more rich abstract metaphorical language inherent in their use and inherent in the message of the craft process used to produce them. As objects, they have a formal and informal ritual base. This combination of visually appealing surfacing and underlying message seems to me to have the most possibilities for exploration of both emotional and scope in depth content.”

McCune received her MFA from the University of South Carolina. Currently, she is involved in two traveling exhibitions: Suitcase Exchange for Tri State Sculptors which travels to 12 sites including New Zealand and an invitational sponsored by six Southern States’ art agencies. She is on the faculty of the Visual Arts Department at Greenville Technical College.

Predicated by Loss:
Ceramics by Doug Gray

Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery
October 3 – November 16, 2006

“It has been said that every adoption is predicated by loss—the loss of a child, the loss of parents, the loss of that biological thread that binds past, present, and future. When I first read these words, I was angered by the premise, almost inexplicably so. The idea seemed in direct conflict with my personal experience in which adoption was a joyful union, a gift, even a panacea. But on further reflection, I realized that this issue of loss, while not immediately or persistently apparent, is nonetheless an issue that must be addressed as one goes about living one’s life. One carries this loss with them just as they carry the memories, regrets and uncertainties resulting from the loss of any loved one, known or not.

“This series was created to address the dichotomy present in joy predicated by loss and also to address the redemption found in accepting both. Perhaps more than ever before, I sought to develop a visual narrative in the work, combining symbolic imagery and forms to better illustrate those sacred moments in which a child is passed from set of hands to another. The vessels are derived from a few essential forms: bells that call out and bring together, prayer wheels and temples that house our most sincere desires and wishes, and finally cisterns that bring the very sustenance of life. The imagery is also laden with symbolism as the fish represent fertility, birds are the couriers from this world to the next, gingko leaves represent a slow and deliberate growth, fingerprints touch upon the very maze of identity, and the almost whimsical fortune cookie encapsulates the very mystery of what fortune might lie ahead.” — Douglas E. Gray, Fall 2006

Student Works by FMU Photography Classes

Smith University Center Gallery
October 31 – November 20, 2006

As the semester’s end nears, students in the various Visual Arts studio classes take part in the selection and installation of representative works created during the semester. In addition to the experience students gain in the selection and installation process, this allows the students’ works to have broader adjudication by the student body at large and by the general public.

Senior Shows by Graduating FMU Visual Arts Majors
Jennifer Hart, Jamel Howard, James Lesley, Jolene McClary and Ashley Seegass

Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery
November 21 – December 16, 2006

Opening Reception 6:30 pm Tuesday, November 21

Student Works by FMU Painting Classes

Smith University Center Gallery
November 28 – December 16, 2006

As the semester’s end nears, students in the various Visual Arts studio classes take part in the selection and installation of representative works created during the semester. In addition to the experience students gain in the selection and installation process, this allows the students’ works to have broader adjudication by the student body at large and by the general public.

Student Works by FMU Ceramics Classes

Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery
December 4-16, 2006

As the semester’s end nears, students in the various Visual Arts studio classes take part in the selection and installation of representative works created during the semester. In addition to the experience students gain in the selection and installation process, this allows the students’ works to have broader adjudication by the student body at large and by the general public.

Carolina Seasons:
Pastels by Tulla Lightfoot

Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery
January 2 – February 15, 2007

“I have been creating pastel drawings inspired by the farm and river scenes found in my area of the Carolinas for the past four years. The rustic scenes of tobacco barns and natural scenic rivers are quickly giving way to housing developments as our population shifts from that of tobacco farming to retirees and I am trying to preserve and draw attention to the unique treasures that we still have.

“For many years I created work using electronic media such as computers and lasers to create holograms. Tiring of expensive lasers, dangerous chemicals and technology, I decided to pick up a pencil and draw. For this series I used pastels. I like the feel of the materials and I enjoy getting messy when I work. I also enjoy the ability to use pastels on top of each other to get changing effects.”

Tulla is an associate professor of art at UNC Pembroke. She has exhibited, travelled and taught in the USA, Mexico, France, and Canada.

Sentimental Epistemology:
Ceramic Head Pots by David Hooker

Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery
January 2 – February 15, 2007

“My work is, simply put, all about me. I make little narrative stories about myself, my family, and my pets–but mostly about me. It about things I love, things I surround myself with (or wish I could surround myself with), things that fascinate me, puzzle me, or make me anxious. I make no claim that I am unique or special: neither is my family. On the contrary, it is because we are so ordinary we are interesting. It is my goal to present mundane and ordinary life in a way that is humorous, joyful, and profound without being trite.

“I also love to make references to other artwork. Be it Greek classical pediment sculpture, Pre-Columbian pots, South Carolina face jugs or modern painting. I love to slam things from different cultures together and see what happens.

“I mostly work with clay because I love clay. To me, the process of clay is ritualistic, meditative- almost sacred. Plus it’s cheap and fast. It is my hope that the finished work will reflect the juxtaposition between that slow, deliberate process and the energetic frenzy of modern life.”

David received his MFA from Kent State University. His work has been exhibited extensively throughout the South. He is currently an assistant professor of art at Wheaton College, Wheaton IL.

Soulscape: Paintings by Harry Arnette McFadden and Tim Green

Smith University Center Gallery
January 9 – March 8, 2007

“I’ve always believed that every picture told a story. The most amazing part of painting is that every person that sees it can come up with a different meaning. I love to hear people tell me what this painting means to them. Sometimes that is the inspiration for the next painting.” Tim Green, a Darlington native, graduated from Benedict College with a BA in commercial Art and Design. He currently works as a graphic artist and lives in Florence, SC.

Harry Arnette McFadden is a self described Afro-Carolinian. He grew up in a community called White Oak, tucked away between Lake City and Kingstree, South Carolina. He describes his artistic gift not as self-taught but as God-inspired. Harry has been influenced by the artwork of William H. Johnson to favor bold colors, storytelling, and complex compositions that seem simple. McFadden’s love for the arts has led to the self-expressions he shares with the world. He has exhibited with James Brown’s Visual Soul (a musical festival held annually in Augusta, Georgia) and local arts councils. His artwork is in private collections throughout the east and west coasts. He received his bachelor’s degree from Francis Marion University and masters in Creative Arts from Lesley University. He is currently employed with the Palmetto Youth Academy in Florence, South Carolina as an art, science and movement instructor.

Pit-Fired Clay Installation:
Sculptures by Mark Gordon

Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery
February 20 – April 5, 2007

“A work of art can serve as societal critique, express personal dream imagery, make reference to archaeological artifacts, explore abstract spatial and temporal concepts, or commemorate and focus ritual.

“My work as an artist began with exploration of the inherent properties and historical uses of ceramic raw materials transformed through fire. Discovering claywork in the early 1970’s was a revelation: the quintessential physicality of this common earthy material, with its remarkable ability to capture and retain any fleeting physical impact or impression, immediately and permanently captured my interest.

“Clay is a universal medium, and potters and their vessels have formed an essential part of material culture. My aesthetic has been formed and informed by my travels to document traditional artisans throughout the Mediterranean and around the Caribbean. From the backyard brickmakers in Aswan and semi-tropical northern Argentina, to isolated wheelthrowers in central Turkey and southern Spain, to a potter making drain pipes on the wheel in northern Syria–these creators make objects to be sold and used, and sometimes to be taken for granted in their function.”

Mark Gordon‘s work can bee seen in Ceramic Monthly, Clay Times and Potterymaking Illustrated magazines. He has exhibited extensive throughout the United States and the world. Gordon is Associate Professor of Art at Barton College in Wilson, North Carolina.

Student Works by FMU Drawing Classes

Smith University Center Gallery
March 13-30, 2007

Student Works by FMU Visual Arts Classes

Smith University Center Gallery
April 3-17, 2007

As the semester’s end nears, students in the various Visual Arts studio classes take part in the selection and installation of representative works created during the semester. In addition to the experience students gain in the selection and installation process, this allows the students’ works to have broader adjudication by the student body at large and by the general public.

Senior Shows by Graduating FMU Visual Arts Majors:
Emily Becker
Anna Dempsey
Matthew Donaldson
Jessica Dunn
Robert Jones
Jay Myers
Brooke Parks
Antonio Shaw

Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery
April 10-20, 2007

Opening Reception 7:00 pm Tuesday, April 10

The Senior Exhibit is a graduation requirement for students majoring in Visual Arts at Francis Marion University.

Student Works by FMU Painting Classes

Smith University Center Gallery
April 19 – May 5, 2007

As the semester’s end nears, students in the various Visual Arts studio classes take part in the selection and installation of representative works created during the semester. In addition to the experience students gain in the selection and installation process, this allows the students’ works to have broader adjudication by the student body at large and by the general public.

Senior Shows by Graduating FMU Visual Arts Majors:
Dewana Cooper Harris
Brian Hess
Tremayne Johnston
Beth Mathews
Jaron Sanders
Vyone Tisdale
Allen Vassalotti
Jonnetta Washington

Hyman Fine Arts Center
April 23 – May 4, 2007

Opening Reception 7:00 pm Monday, April 23

The Senior Exhibit a graduation requirement for students majoring in Visual Arts at Francis Marion University.

Student Works by FMU Ceramics and 3D Design Classes

Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery
April 23 – May 5

As the semester’s end nears, students in the various Visual Arts studio classes take part in the selection and installation of representative works created during the semester. In addition to the experience students gain in the selection and installation process, this allows the students’ works to have broader adjudication by the student body at large and by the general public.

The Quilting Way II: Quilts by the Swamp Fox Quilters Guild

Smith University Center Gallery
May 22 – July 24, 2007
8:00 am – 5:30 pm Mon-Thur; 8:00-11:00 am Fri

The Swamp Fox Quilters Guild was started in 1980. Its purpose is to educate, create, and stimulate interest in maintaining, protecting, collecting and preserving quilts. Also, the group strives to unite members in bonds of friendship through the shared appreciation of quilt making,

The guild, with approximately 50 members, meets the first Thursday of each month at 9:30 a.m. at John Calvin Presbyterian Church, except for July. It has an annual “quilting challenge.” Yearly, it exhibits at The Columns during the Civil War re-enactment, displaying quilts and giving demonstrations. Also, it makes community service quilts for nursing homes, shelters and various civic organizations.

2D & 3D Multi Media Group Show
featuring Ray & Barbara Moore, Donna Goodman, Jo Jeffers, Tom Herzog, Walter Sallenger, Dewey Ervin, Pollie Bristow, Sasha & Tari Federer

Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery
May 22 – July 10, 2007
8:00 am – 5:30 pm Mon-Thur; 8:00-11:00 am Fri