“Morning Walk in the Pee Dee — Images of Wildflowers We Don’t See” by Donna Goodman

Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery
May 10 – August 11, 2011
8:30 am – 5:00 pm Mon-Thurs

Raised on a twenty-mule team tobacco, cotton, pig and cow farm on the cusp of a Carolina Bay, Donna H. Goodman is a native of the Shiloh Community, Sumter County. She is Professor Emeritus of Art at Francis Marion University. Donna, her husband Dewey Ervin and their Jack Russell terrier, Eloise, live in the Pocket Road area near Florence in the Pee Dee region of South Carolina.

Goodman started producing digital images in 1993. Since then, her work has been included in over seventy-five nationally juried exhibitions and twenty international exhibitions. The images in the “Morning Walk in the Pee Dee” series now number in the thousands.

“Forms and Surfaces” by Roger D. Dalrymple

Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery
May 10 – August 11, 2011
8:30 am – 5:00 pm Mon-Thurs

Roger Dalrymple received degrees in architecture and in art from K.U. and K.S.U. He expanded his southwest studies at Paolo Soleri’s Arcosanti in Arizona and studied at the L.A. Design Center and the Royal Academy of Art in Copenhagen, Denmark. He has worked as an artist, architect and teacher in Oklahoma, Colorado and Alaska prior to moving to Greenville, S.C.

“My forms are an expression of my life long exposure to the American Indian Tribes of the Plains and Southwest United States, the Haida and Aleut Tribes of the Pacific Northwest, the Inupiat, Eskimo and Athabascan Tribes of Alaska and the Maori, Aboriginal People of New Zealand and Australia. Frank Lloyd Wright, Bruce Goff and Fay Jones work influenced my architectural dreams as all three architects had projects under construction around Tulsa during my formative years.”

Avenue B and 9th: Paintings by Robert Garey

Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery
August 23 – September 24, 2011
8:30 am – 5:00 pm Mon-Fri

Robert Garey grew up in Florence and graduated from McClenaghan High School in 1971. After “rambling” for a few years, he enrolled at FMU and took all the art courses available in the curriculum at that time. In 1976 he moved to Charleston, and had studios on The Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island. While there, in addition to painting and freelance work, he found employment in the film industry as a scenic artist and sign painter when they were in the area shooting a movie.

Garey moved to New York City and set up a studio there in 1986. He worked as a sign painter to begin with, while spending time at The Art Students League drawing from the life models. He also worked as a freelance mural painter in several large commercial studios. Then in 1990 he enrolled at the Graduate School of the New York Academy of Art where he completed the course requirements for the MFA in studio painting.

Then, in partnership with another artist, he maintained his own mural studio where they produced large scale murals for private residences. He also worked for the Sotheby’s and Christie’s auction houses painting replicas of paintings for their clients. He lived in the city for twenty-six years before moving his studio back to Florence in February, 2011. He still maintains his sign shop in the Williamsburg district of Brooklyn, and so Gary now splits his time between Florence and NY.

“These paintings were made between 1999 and 2009. I lived for twenty years just east of the corner of Avenue B on East 9th street in New York City’s Lower East Side. It was during this time I made these paintings. Right across the avenue is Tompkins Square Park. These paintings depict that park and my friends and other local denizens of the neighborhood. I called upon the traditions of classical narrative painting and portraiture, as I do in all my studio work, to make these paintings.”

“Dualism” — Works by Jon McMillan

Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery
August 23 – September 24, 2011
8:30 am – 5:00 pm Mon-Fri

Jon McMillan earned an M.F.A. in Ceramics from Southern Illinois University in Edwardsville in 2009 and a B.F.A in Studio Art from James Madison University in 1998. Jon is currently Visiting Assistant Professor of Ceramics at University of Mary Washington, Fredericksburg, VA. In 2010 he held the position of Adjunct Instructor / Studio Technician at University of South Carolina, Columbia SC.

“My work explores dualities–simple and complex, formal and conceptual, internal and external. I use juxtaposition and ambiguity to create objects and installations that speak to both general and specific dichotomies, allowing viewers to bring their own experiences to bear in the interpretation of the work. The meticulous and time-consuming process of making, and the drawn-out multiple firings I employ allow for a more complex and reactionary method of creation. Through this way of making, I am able to gradually build interesting forms and textures, with layers of meaning augmented by the layering of shape and surface. While this body of work generates from my own personal ideas concerning symbiosis, conflict, and humankind’s relationship with the natural world, I engage my audience by making objects that pique interest through their vague and surreal nature. While the forms and surfaces in each component of the work are evocative, they are not immediately recognizable. My hope is to encourage dialogue by raising questions instead of providing answers.”

“Funk and Awesome!” by Mike and Patz Fowle

Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery
September 27 – November 10, 2011
8:30 am – 5:00 pm Mon-Fri

Artists Reception: 5:00-7:00 pm Thursday, October 6, 2011
(followed by the Stephen Anderson jazz concert)

Once you’ve seen their work, you will know why Mike and Patz Fowle have developed an international reputation. Patz appears in more than a dozen books on art as well as textbooks for her unique handbuilding technique. Mike has had work in the South Carolina State Museum and recently had a solo show at the Black Creek Arts Center in Hartsville, SC. Titled The Green Exhibit, it was made entirely from “repurposed” objects.

In a way, Funk and Awesome! is a “turning back the clock” exhibit for the Fowles. All works displayed in this show have been created jointly by the artists. “He throws the pot or vase and I take it from there,” says Patz of the whimsical additions she makes to Mike’s wheel-thrown forms. “These are the types of pieces we did before moving to South Carolina,” Mike added.

The Fowles lived in New York from 1979 to 1989, earning their living by creating and selling unique works of art. During this time is when Patz mastered her ceramic technique and the couple traveled the nation selling at fine arts and crafts shows.

After revisiting their Michigan roots for a year, the couple moved to their Darlington County home and began with a new focus for their artwork: education. Both are artists-in-residence with the South Carolina Arts Commission.

Senior Shows by Graduating FMU Visual Arts Majors:
Thomas Buckman, William Lazenby, Chappell McMillan, Monica Mitchell and Cecelia E. Mooneyhan

Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery
November 15 – December 17, 2011
8:30 am – 5:00 pm Mon-Fri

Opening reception will be at 6:00 pm on Tuesday, November 15, in the Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery.

Senior shows are required of all students majoring in Visual Arts. These shows give students hands-on experience in selection and installation of artworks, publicity of exhibition, and external review by the University community and the general public.

Student Works by FMU Design and Ceramics Classes

Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery
December 5-17, 2011
8:30 am – 5:00 pm Mon-Fri

A showcase of new works created during the current semester by students learning skills in visual arts classes.

“Art Interpreting Music” by Ev Niewoehner

Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery
January 10 – February 16, 2012
8:30 am – 5:00 pm Mon-Fri

“Although I have worked in a number of genres, including still life, landscape, cityscape, and surrealism, it has been the subject of music which has captured my imagination and has led to my most enjoyable and satisfying work.

“Music is a universal language and, for most people, it speaks to the heart and soul. For me, music is an essential part of my life. It has become the central theme in my painting career. I have developed at least four distinct styles of music themed paintings and have produced a large body of work in each style. But I’m not done. I continue to visualize, to explore, to experiment with new ideas, new techniques, new compositions, new colors, in order to illustrate and bring definition to the essence of music.”

Ev Niewoehner was born in rural Iowa and at age ten moved with his family to Colorado. He graduated from Fort Collins High School and later earned history degrees from Colorado State University and the University of Northern Colorado. He also studied art at several universities. After teaching at the high school level for four years, he owned and operated an art gallery in Los Angeles. Teaching opportunities brought him to Tennessee where he taught for twenty one years.

In 1999, Niewoehner retired from teaching which allowed him to concentrate on his first love, oil painting, an activity at which he is working full time. Although working with a number of genres, it has been the subject of music which has dominated the bulk of his body of work. Niewoehner has exhibited in a number of galleries and art centers in Los Angeles, New Orleans, Nashville, Memphis, Birmingham, Atlanta, Rome, GA, Estes Park, CO, Fairhope, AL, and Dickson, TN, where he maintains his studio and home. He has a daughter, who lives in Nashville and is a teacher with Metro schools.

“Much Ado About Nothing” — Ceramics by Johnny Nutt

Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery
January 10 – February 16, 2012
8:30 am – 5:00 pm Mon-Fri

“Around 1999 an architect friend of mine showed me an article in a trade magazine entitled “Hot jobs for the new millennium”. It listed “potter” at #3. She asked me what I thought about that, to which I replied “It was obviously not written by a potter!”

“I know I’m not going to affect any change in society, whether large or small, as an artist. I find that very liberating. Nor do I make what I make as a means of income. I did that at one point, and I hated what it did to my work. I found myself spending more time making stuff that would sell than I did being engaged in a joyous process. So I quit that. It’s meant that my time in the studio has decreased, but the percentage of my time in the studio spent doing what I want to do, instead of what I have to do, has increased dramatically.

“My work is, at its most basic, all about contrasts: busy and spare, glossy and flat, light and dark, smooth and rough, round and angular, mechanical and organic, substantive and superficial. I enjoy working on the wheel, plain and simple. I tend to work in long series, first producing a studio full of forms, stopping only when I have either run out of clay or adequate shelf-space. At that point I basically put the wheel away so I can turn my attention completely to the task of addressing the surfaces of the vessels and platters.

“While I occasionally use some source imagery for my designs, such as sub-cellular structures, seed, leaf, and pollen forms, satellite photography and fluid-systems, I tend to abstract that imagery to the point of non-objectivity. I have no real interest in reality. If it already exists in the world, I see no need to rehash it. I prefer to make new stuff. I use very simple glazing techniques, usually limited to terra sigillata and a small amount of glaze.

“I also enjoy indulging my need to create what I like to call Juvenile Poetry for the titles of my work. These titles serve no illustrative purpose though. While they satisfy the need for titles, it is my hope that by intentionally confusing the viewer it may be perceived that there is actually some substance to my work, which there isn’t. It’s entirely vacuous. There’s nothing there. Again, I find that very liberating. So much in life is necessarily serious. I feel no need to add to that.”

Johnny Nutt is a native South Carolinian, born in Walterboro, raised in Chapin. He attended Furman, where he studied under Bob Chance, and the University of South Carolina, where he studied under Tom Dimig. In the time between finishing school and now (20 years), he has worked in advertising, food service, the music business, and non-profit arts administration. He is currently teaching high school art at TL Hanna high school in Anderson, SC. He maintains a home studio in Easley, SC.

African American Art from the collection of Cassandra Rush

Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery
February 21 – March 31, 2012
8:30 am – 5:00 pm Mon-Fri

Growing up in Williamsburg County between the Nesmith community and the town of Kingstree, Ms. Rush does not remember viewing art in any form as a child. She could distinguish beauty from not-so-appealing objects, but the realization of art was not conceptualized until she was a student in the required Art Appreciation class at Morgan State University in Baltimore, MD.

She kept her book from that class as a means to be face-to face with the many artists from Michelangelo to Andy Warhol, and the few African American artists that were included in the publication. The visual arts became ingrained in her and new ventures into visiting museums and galleries became a focus and a mission.

She became a dealer of African American art in 1990 with the main focus to accessorize her new home with the art she loves. In the process of meeting new artists and admiring their works, she became a collector of African American art. She collects works of-and-by African Americans.

Now, she sees art in all aspects of everyday life in the clouds, forests, gardens, archectiture, fabrics, city skylines, and in all of her surroundings and changing environment. She tries to share these experiences with her children and grandchildren, and children of all ages.

Her collection of art, dolls, Black Memorabilia, stamps, books, figurines, cookie jars, salt and pepper shakers, etc. will soon be finding a permanent home at the ‘Cassandra Williams Rush Center for African-American Arts & Culture’ in Kingstree at 200 Hampton Avenue.

Various exhibitions will be rotating with December featuring ‘A Beautiful Black Christmas’ displaying Black angels, Santas, nativity scenes, nutcrackers, stockings and Christmas trees decorated with Black ornaments.

Ms. Rush is the oldest of seven children of David and Edith Williams of Kingstree, SC. She earned a B.S. in Chemistry form Morgan State University and a M.P.H. from USC. She has been employed as a chemist, Engineer, Adjunct College Faculty, and HBCU-UP Project and Data Manager. Currently, she manages the Williams Vineyard and Farm in Nesmith, SC., and will manage and curate the exhibitions at the new Cultural Center.

She is excited about the privilege to exhibit works of African American art from her collection.

Feather Pottery by Sasha and Tari Federer

Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery
February 21 – March 31, 2012
8:30 am – 5:00 pm Mon-Fri

Sasha & Tari Federer have been working with clay for over 35 years. Sasha, born in Prague, Czech Republic, moved to the USA in the early 70’s. He studied ceramic art in Washington, Wisconsin, and worked for three years as a professional potter in New Hampshire and served as artist-in-residence with the National Endowment for the Arts. Tari spent much of her life in the Southwest. She studied as an art major at Ventura College and the University of California Santa Barbara. Ten years ago she closed her studio in North Carolina and moved to Florence, SC to marry and join forces with Sasha. Their joining has resulted in a creative collaboration in their quest to create objects of beauty and functionality in clay.

In addition to exhibiting at The Chameleon Art Gallery, Darlington, SC, Lowcountry Artists, Ltd., Charleston, SC & Interiors of Asheville, Asheville, NC, Tari & Sasha have jointly made one of their artistic dreams come true by opening the Running Horse Gallery beside their studio and home in Florence, SC. Their artwork is one-of-a kind, hand crafted, using an array of firing techniques and surface decoration. Occasionally, the couple will work on the same piece. When this is done, it is signed Satari, a combination of both names.

Senior Shows by Graduating FMU Visual Arts Majors

April 3-12 (Reception 6 pm April 3)
Katherine Barnette, Symon Gibson, Myra Moore, Nicole Ouellette and Tiffany Thomas

April 13-24 (Reception 6 pm April 13)
Mallory Eggert, Shauna Lair, Hallie Legg and Hannah Maltry

April 25-May 5 (Reception 6 pm April 25)
Aaron Gotter, Eleni Gotter, Angela Jackson and Julia Nwanegwo

Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery
April 3 – May 5, 2012
8:30 am – 5:00 pm Mon-Fri

Senior shows are required of all students majoring in Visual Arts. These shows give students hands-on experience in selection and installation of artworks, publicity of exhibition, and external review by the University community and the general public.

Printmaking Lecture by Julie Niskanen

Francis Marion University Lecture Series
Lowrimore Lecture Hall, Cauthen Educational Media Center
April 5, 2012
7:00 pm

While participating in the Department of Fine Art’s April 5-7 printmaking symposium at Francis Marion University, Julie Niskanen will hold a public lecture on her work.

Julie Niskanen spent her first seven years in Greenville, South Carolina, and family moves eventually took her to Newark, Delaware and Chicago, Illinois. She received a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Iowa State University in 2005. During the summer of 2003 she lived and studied in Rome, Italy, and traveled around Europe. In 2008, Julie received a Master of Fine Arts in printmaking from the University of South Dakota, where she also managed the fine art gallery and taught drawing classes. Julie now lives in Raleigh, North Carolina, where she works as a professional artist and teaches art courses at Wake Technical Community College. Additionally, she teaches printmaking workshops in Raleigh. Julie is also part of the Artspace Artists Association in Raleigh, Davidson Galleries in Seattle, and the Washington Printmakers Gallery in Silver Spring, MD.

Living in so many places and having experienced many different environments have had a significant influence on Julie’s creative work. She uses images from nature to represent changes in both nature as well as her own life. Always stimulated by the contemporary art world, Julie attends conferences and workshops across the country and gives visiting artist workshops at various art centers and universities. Her award-winning work has been exhibited extensively in national and international exhibitions, and is in many private and public collections.

Visit julieniskanen.com for additional information and to view selected works.